Here Maps (@here)

Background

HERE wanted to showcase their map service to new audiences by turning their @HERE Twitter account into a smart route planner.  Ask HERE the way to your destination or recommendation for a nearby restaurant, bar; find a swimming pool or hairdresser.

Solution

Proxima designed a natural language workflow that allows Twitter users to take advantage of HERE’s new service. All you have to do is tweet @HERE a question and include the #AskHERE tag. @HERE replies with a map, estimated travel time, a link for turn-by-turn directions, personalised to your part of the world. In the US, the answer is in miles, in the rest of the world the results are in kilometres.

We trained Iris to understand tweeted questions in natural language such as, “Where’s the closest cafe?”, or “How do I get to Bondi Beach?” Iris queries the HERE Routing API or Places API in a similar way to how HERE delivers navigation services, and serves the best answer based on proximity and relevance. For the best experience, you should have location enabled for your tweet. If your tweet doesn’t have a specific location, the best possible is returned. @HERE also provides a gif showing how to enable location if you would like to resubmit your request.

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Just as you’d ask friends for recommendations using natural language, @HERE will give you a suggestion with detailed directions to where you want to go based on your geotagged tweet. Voice guidance is one tap away by using the link to open the destination in HERE WeGo.

Outcome

Asking for a route or location can now bring a quick reply to most basic navigational questions. Using Iris’ Conversation Engine to power @HERE  is a great demonstration of creating interactive, responsive services on top of Twitter.

Read more about how HERE launched the experience: HERE 360 and from Twitter AU